This is a good one for anyone newly diagnosed. I touched on a few of these over the past few months, and will probably go on to post a few more diet related posts (I found some of my old diabetes Ed. papers!), but here’s a great place to start!

Greentree Pharmacy

diabetesNot me. Those may be the first words that come to mind if you’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. It isn’t news anyone wants to hear. It’s true—you will need to make some changes, but your life sure isn’t over. And, with so many diabetes resources online and in your community, you don’t have to go it alone.

First, it may help to get a little clearer about what diabetes is. Your body needs insulin to break down sugar (glucose) into energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body either doesn’t have enough insulin or doesn’t use it well. So glucose stays in your blood, causing problems.1

There isn’t a cure for type 2 diabetes. But you can learn to manage it well. You can keep your blood glucose in a safe range by balancing the food you eat with exercise—and medicine, if your doctor prescribes it.Be sure…

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Veggies: Cruel and Unusual Nourishment.

If your kid is anything like mine, dinnertime can prove itself to be…. challenging, monotonous, even.Chicken nuggets, mac and cheese, spaghetti (with butter only, of course), pizza… you know the deal. If it looks like a vegetable, smells like a vegetable, or even sounds like it could be named after a vegetable, it’s out of the question.

I don’t know about other moms, but I have found only a few ways to sneak veggies into my kid without a meltdown. I rely on Fruitables (made by Apple & Eve) and any other food/drink that has some kind of sneaky vegetable juice or something. (Shoulda had a V8! *smack*)

I recently took a stand and decided that this kid was going to eat her vegetables or she wasn’t leaving the table, because, ya know, that worked so well in the past. I made her some spaghetti with a little bit of tomato sauce that I had in the fridge, and I mixed in a bag of steamed veggies, trying to be sneaky. When (as expected) she detected the infiltrators, which was immediately, she started in with the whole “I’m not hungry” bit. When that didn’t work, she went to crying, then to yelling, then to throwing the fork. All of those things just led her to a standoff with me at the table.

I made her eat them, yeah that’s right I MADE her. I sat there with her and actually fed her those stupid vegetables for 45 minutes until they were all cold and gross. Then, when she told me she was full, I asked again, and threw the contents of the bowl out. 15 minutes later, she asked me for a snack and I said NO. She looked at me like I just killed a puppy in front of her. She went to bed that night with no snack, no nothing and I felt accomplished, crappy, but accomplished.

The next night I served chicken nuggets.

The veggie thing has really got me stopped up. I mean, it’s not like I’m strapping her down and gagging her with carrots or anything. Any ideas for getting  toddlers to eat their veggies? I’m pretty much just sticking to mac and cheese for the time being, counting potatoes and corn as veggies, and praying this just fixes itself because I am SO OVER the Guantanamo Bay of dinner tables thing.

 

This CARE USB Bracelet Is Probably the Coolest Thing I Own…. Medically. (A Review!)

Alright, I have another medical alert bracelet to review and this one’s super awesome. This is actually the bracelet that I asked to review when I was given the opportunity to review the Sabona one as well. This one took me a bit longer because there were some things I wanted to test out before I could accurately post a review. Anyway, here goes…..

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Packaging: Standard plastic wrapping, instructions included (it didn’t come with that box, though)

This thing is super durable, super easy to use, and super versatile  It’s sporty and, while appears large and awkwardly shaped, is no more intrusive than a watch. There is the medical alert symbol on the front (which I wear on the inside of my wrist) and C.A.R.E on the back (shows on top of my wrist) and the inside reads, “Plug into a USB port for my medical history” and the website for the manufacturer, “www.MedicalHistoryBracelet.com”.

According to the website that sells these bad boys (well, one of them), these bracelets are waterproof despite their natural, um… hate for water… they ARE little USB drives and all. As far as the waterproof thing goes, I have submerged my arm in my fish tank with this on, I have washed dishes/bottles/kid cups with this on and it got all wet and there has been no problems so far. I still can’t bring myself to shower with it on, but I’m sure it wouldn’t be a problem seeing as how it’s been submerged and it was fine.

If you can’t tell from the picture, there is a medical alert symbol on the front of the bracelet (which comes in a bunch of different colors and styles, btw) and then that’s it as far as outward medical labels go. This is good because it’s not only versatile BUT it’s also private.

Okay, so once you get past the exterior (which is made of some cool latex-free plastic-y material), you get the actual programming (3.0 e-manager something or other), which looks like this (Oh yeah, there are screenshots)

This bracelet is totally plug in play, here's what someone would see when they plugged the bracelet into a computer.

This bracelet is totally plug n play, here’s what someone would see when they plugged the bracelet into a computer.

Care E-Manager Home Screen. Name, picture, public profile for medical professionals, and edit history for admin user.

Care E-Manager Home Screen. Name, picture, public profile for medical professionals, and edit history for admin user.

There are multiple profiles you can add and manage, therefore letting you keep your whole family's history on here if you want to.

There are multiple profiles you can add and manage, therefore letting you keep your whole family’s history on here if you want to.

Here's just a quick shot of some of the info you can put on here. I wanted to show how easy, clean, and user friendly the interface is.

Here’s just a quick shot of some of the info you can put on here. I wanted to show how easy, clean, and user friendly the interface is.

You can password protect the "edit history" part so that only "public view" is accessable. You can even pick which fields are public and which require a password to view (insurance info maybe?)

You can password protect the “edit history” part so that only “public view” is accessible. You can even pick which fields are public and which require a password to view (insurance info maybe?)

You can add files as well! I used this to add a PDF of my most recent blood work. You could use it for anything really. This field does NOT show up on the public view, so you would need a password to access it, but it's a GREAT feature.

You can add files as well! I used this to add a PDF of my most recent blood work. You could use it for anything really. This field does NOT show up on the public view, so you would need a password to access it, but it’s a GREAT feature.

This is what the "public view" is... it's a little empty because I, ya know, left my personal info off of here.

This is what the “public view” is… it’s a little empty because I, ya know, left my personal info off of here.

I feel like that’s pretty comprehensive, actually. I love that there is a spot for a photo. I feel like it’s a great “just in case” feature. I also LOVE that I can add files and profiles.

I would say that this is a must have for ANYONE with a medical condition. It’s a great way to keep basic, necessary medical files and info in one place (for everyone!) It’s sporty design is durable, great for everyday use, isn’t too great for cocktail parties (black dress and plastic medical alert bracelet? not so much), but is sure to suit your every day needs. If plastic-y material isn’t your thing, there are a lot of really pretty ones (including this one that I love!) on the website that are more delicate, yet still keep the USB functionality.

This bay boy sells for 29.95USD on Elegant Medical Alert’s website.

 

Drawn to this Sabona Magnetic Medical Alert Bracelet! (A Review) Updated!

***UPDATE: I ended up reviewing this and re-posting it after making some changes. Apparently, I was getting some of my facts confused. Oops!***

Ok, let me start off by saying that I was not paid to write this review, I was sent this bracelet to review honestly, and I intend to.

So right from the start the packaging is pretty nice, so if you are thinking about getting this for a gift for someone (this is a woman’s bracelet), you are pretty good right out of the box. Don’t believe me? That’s okay, here’s a photo (what would one of my reviews be without 1,000 photos, right?):

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The bracelet itself if very nice looking. It is definitely good for everyday wear. I don’t know that I would really wear it in the shower and whatnot (a lot of these types of bracelets have rhodium plating and it can wear away after exposure), But it’s definitely a good, understated piece to add to your collection of jewelry (or medical alert bracelets, if you have one, I guess). There is also a wallet card in there that has info like your name, address, medical condition, meds, emergency contact, and so on.

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Now, there are all kinds of magnets and things going on here and I have to say, they are definitely really cool. I don’t happen to notice any difference in the magnetic bracelets vs. non-magnetic ones, but I guess I don’t really know what I’m looking for. I would assume if you were to opt to buy this specific bracelet for someone or yourself, you know a little of the positive effects of magnetic therapy. For some info about it, check this link out. 

The bracelet is beautiful, yet understated. I can wear this with a white t-shirt and jeans, OR with a little black dress and it would look good either way. I love the look of this bracelet, I can’t say it enough!

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I DO have one little problem with this bracelet, and I do mean little. The symbol for “Medical alert” is very small and I think would be easy to miss. This concerns me a bit. The back of the link with the alert symbol says “DIABETES – see wallet card” which is surely sufficient. My take? Yeah, the medical alert symbol is pretty small, but it comes with a wallet card and, if God forbid there was in incident where you were out of it (enough to someone to need to see a medical alert bracelet), first responders would look through your wallet for an ID anyway and BOOM the card is there. Either way, you’re good to go.

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BOTTOM LINE:

Pros: great design, secure clasp, magnetic qualities, wallet card included.

Cons: small medical alert symbol

Overall, I love this bracelet and intent to wear it often. It is durable, beautiful, and would work with almost any jewelry piece I would wear OR works on its own. While the symbol is small, I would be carrying a wallet card so if someone missed the medical alert symbol (which they wouldn’t if they looked), I would still be good. While I remain undecided on the magnetic therapy part, I have no experience with it, so I know either way.

Here’s the link for the bracelet on the website if you want to check it out, it sells for 34.95 USD

I vote 4 out of 5 stars!

How do you feel about this? Interesting, no?

What I’m Wearing… On My Arms, That Is.

Yesterday, I posted about my medical alert bracelet but afterwards, I realized that there are just a couple other things that I wear every day that are super important to me, and I figured I’d share them.

In addition to my already discussed med bracelet I wear these two:

My anchor bracelet and my "Imagine" silicone bracelet.

My anchor bracelet and my “Imagine” silicone bracelet.

My anchor bracelet was sent to me by my best friend and unintentionally means a lot to me. I happened to have a lot of crap going on when I received this bracelet. I was in the process of changing some things around in my life to make things better for me and everyone else. This is totally symbolic of me anchoring myself and getting a grip on my life. I never take it off, well except to shower, it IS leather.

The other one is a cheap little silicone bracelet that came in a pack of those o-ring bracelets that kids used to wear a million of when I was in school. I found three packs for 50 cents a piece at WalMart and bought them for Haley’s stocking for Christmas. When she got around to opening the one that contained this particular bracelet, she came over to me and goes, “Here, Mommy! This one’s yours!”. Okay, I know it sounds lame, but if you have kids you know how cute that is. But I don’t wear it because it was a cute thing. I wear it to remind myself to keep an open mind, to imagine things. It’s the innocence of a three-year old reminding me to imagine that makes me keep this one on all the time…. the fact that it was cute doesn’t hurt either. 🙂

Anyone else up for sharing?

 

To Medical ID or Not To Medical ID, THAT Is The Question.

When it comes to wearing a medical alert bracelet, there are many different opinions that I’ve heard and/or read. Some people think that it calls attention when they don’t want it, some think it invades their privacy (they don’t want everyone to know they have a medical condition). Other people think they are just not necessary. I think they are, if not necessary, at least a pretty good idea.

Do I think that medical alert bracelets bring unwanted attention to something I’d prefer to keep quiet? Sometimes. But I also don’t hide from my diabetes anymore, I embrace it; use it as a tool to teach someone something new about it. I can, however, understand not wanting to call attention to a medical condition, not everyone needs to know. If you aren’t going to wear a medical alert bracelet, you should really consider carrying SOMETHING on you that says you have a medical condition (preferably something less vague than ‘I have a medical condition’). Keep it in your wallet/purse just in case.

I wear my own medical ID bracelet that I made. I DO NOT like the ones they sell at the drugstores for ten dollars. I think they are masculine, and while durable, don’t fit my persona too well.

There are a few places around the net to pick up a nice/girly/unique medical alert bracelet if you aren’t into the stereotypical manly chain and long metal piece with a giant red thing on it…ugh. I don’t even want to get into it.

StickMe Designs put out their line of Tuff Bands which are really cool. They look super durable, come in neat colors, and let people know just what they need to.

There are also a lottttt of really cool ones on Etsy. They’re all over, but here’s a link to an Etsy search for them. Don’t say I never gave you anything.

Chubby Chico Charms sells just the charm that says DIABETES on one side and has the medical alert symbol on the other. These are what I bought and used to make my own medical alert bracelets. The cool thing about these is that with a jump ring and any clasp, you can turn any bracelet into a medical alert bracelet by just clipping the charm on to the bracelet! I do this sometimes if I’m going somewhere and happen to be wearing a jewelry set and don’t want to wear another bracelet.

Besides the one I have been wearing lately, I also have clipped the charm on to a really nice Lia Sophia bracelet I wore the other day, though, most recently, I have the charm clipped on to a pink hair tie on my wrist. I’m still searching for the perfect material (something that can get wet, withstand the gym, isn’t made of metal, and isn’t going to stand out/clash with anything else I wear)

If you want something really compatible with everything, go for the charms and just attach them to either a designated bracelet, or whatever you’re wearing. I think I bought like 8 or 10 on these charms, just to have. There are TONS of different options out there, if you are looking. There’s even ones out there with usb drives in them!

What’s your take on it? Do you wear a medical alert bracelet? Why, or why not?

My most recent medical alert bracelet is actually a Chubby Chico charm on a durable necklace!

My most recent medical alert bracelet is actually a Chubby Chico charm on a durable necklace!